Photo Q&A – Episode 2: Who Cares About Camera Product Strategies?

By | 2016-05-03T10:25:28+00:00 Apr 5th, 2016|

Here’s Episode 2 of my Photo Q&A series! In this video, I’m fielding two questions asked by an author of an article published by PetaPixel. You may have already seen this article make the rounds yesterday, likely because of its undeniably click-baiting title. Unsurprisingly, this piece sparked a cozy flame war between Sony fans and detractors. Admittedly, I didn’t make it past the first two paragraphs because I was left with a complete sense of bewilderment over why someone would waste so much of their time composing such an unfulfilling story. Instead of spending my time reading the rest of it, I decided to record this next installment of my Photo Q&A series.

When you’re done, let me know your thoughts on this subject in the comments below. Enjoy!

12 Comments

  1. Greg H April 5, 2016 at 5:34 pm - Reply

    Agreed – a bit provocative with the [unnecessary] name calling. I’m almost ready to pull the trigger on selling my current kit and moving toward Sony, and a buddy forwarded me this article. I confess is made me question my decision – and it is great advice to rent for a few days to see if its what I really think it will be. Thanks Brian!

    • Brian Matiash April 5, 2016 at 7:19 pm - Reply

      Renting is a solid move, especially if you can time it for when you can go on a significant shoot. I made my switch to Sony after spending 11 years with Canon and, for what it’s worth, I haven’t regretted it once.

      • Sherry Laflamme April 18, 2016 at 9:06 am - Reply

        Thanks for this Q&A, Brian. I have spent $$$ renting lenses before buying. First of all, renting is not at all expensive and way less troublesome than buying and finding out the item is not what you had hoped for. Second, it’s just plain fun to try out new stuff and it forces you to get out and shoot up a storm to get your money’s worth (usually do it over a weekend or for an event). Now I am about to rent an A6000 to see if it would be a good back up camera to my Nikon D750.
        Wouldn’t mind your thoughts on this APSC if you have a chance. Had a Nikon D7000 and hated the noise. So, I am concerned about that issu

        • Brian Matiash April 18, 2016 at 9:19 am - Reply

          As always, thanks for contributing to the comments, Sherry.

          I’ve owned the a6000 for a bit now and have been very happy with its performance, although I also temper my expectations. I feel that not enough people do that. The a6000 would make for a very worthy back up camera and I’d go so far as to say that it could easily take the spot of your primary camera.

          Noise will become an issue once your start pushing your ISO beyond 3200 IMO but it can be mitigated well enough using software. Let me know what you find out after you rent it.

          • Sherry Laflamme April 18, 2016 at 9:26 am - Reply

            Thanks Brian, I will.

            • Ray Ford April 21, 2016 at 12:52 pm - Reply

              Just curious what your thoughts are about the batteries and the A7. Went into the system precisely because I could take it into places in the Southwest that my Canon Mark III is a pain to carry with me. Invested a fair amount of $$ in the body and also a number of the lenses. Thoroughly enjoyed using the camera BUT still got very frustrated with how fast you go through the batteries. Ended up with 4 batteries and still issues having enough power for a full day. That alone has kept me from using the camera much anymore.

              Has someone solved the battery issues?

              • Brian Matiash April 21, 2016 at 2:32 pm - Reply

                Battery life is something that I always have in the back of my mind. I always carry at least four freshly charged cells with me. With that said, I only buy official Sony batteries because I’ve had horrible luck with third party ones. They barely hold a charge and die really quickly.

        • whodeytink April 22, 2016 at 4:54 am - Reply

          Sherry, I have an A6000 and love it. I use it much more than my Nikon D7000. The quality I see out of the A6000 is as good as or even better than my D7000. One note – I don’t take a lot of low light level images, except sunsets or sunrises – never had a noise issue with either camera in those cases. The Sony is so small and easy to carry vs the DSLR.
          If my budget allowed I would move to the Sony FF to replace the Nikon.

      • Susannah Sofaer Kramer April 21, 2016 at 10:02 am - Reply

        I also made the switch after many years as a Canon shooter, and have also never regretted the switch, in fact I am overjoyed by it. I think the most marvelous thing is being able to see your exposure and DOF before shooting, no more chimping and checking the histogram after the fact!

  2. Kelly Dazet April 6, 2016 at 8:16 am - Reply

    Well said, Brian! I totally agree with you. I love that Sony is progressive, innovative and pushing the boundaries of technology. Actually they have a history of doing a lot of R&D. As did Minolta before Sony purchased their photographic division. And customers really need to ” try before they buy”. I love my A7. For me, it is pretty close to being the perfect travel camera (well nothing is perfect after all, so of course I have a couple nits). We fly to Europe often and having FF light weight kit makes a huge difference over lugging my A99 and larger and heavier lenses. (BTW, sorry about the being grumpy about the focus hold button on my 50mm macro, which I should add is an excellent lens — love it for travel. I use it a lot for macro of all the excellent food, wine and beer we encounter in our travels). Thanks again for all your excellent work!

  3. Sherry Laflamme May 11, 2016 at 7:55 am - Reply

    Brian, I finally had a chance to use the Sony a6000. My biggest peeve is getting to the focus point. I know this is hard for me to explain but perhaps you as a sony rep of sorts can help me.
    Here’s the issue: I generally use my Nikon d750 and shoot almost entirely manual. Sometimes, when composing a shot, I want to focus on something off to the side, like, let’s say, a gator eye (I live in FL) but I want his entire body in the pic but mostly want his eye in perfect focus. So, I simply press my up/down/left/right control to move my focus point. I do not have to go into a menu or hit extra buttons in order to hit my focus “control arrows”. They are just there all the time.
    Now, with the Sony, I had to go to menu to reconfigure a button/wheel (I chose right wheel) This was fine, no problem. But then I had to hit the center/Ok button, then tap the right side of the wheel, then turn the wheel to move the focus point to the (for example) gator eye. And that was for each and every shot. All of that poking and moving while using the view finder caused several missed shots at a local event that was not static like my gator example.
    Is this something that is typical of Sony mirrorless, or is it me not understanding something? Other than that, I was amazed at how great the shots were.
    Your input would be greatly appreciated. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a688f49f061571af0d58909a42e250b2dac0d4ade794801ad46e1da53eb6276e.jpg

  4. Sherry Laflamme May 12, 2016 at 9:51 am - Reply

    Brian, I finally had a chance to use the Sony a6000. My biggest peeve is
    getting to the focus point. I know this is hard for me to explain but
    perhaps you as a sony rep of sorts can help me.
    Here’s the issue: I
    generally use my Nikon d750 and shoot almost entirely manual. Sometimes,
    when composing a shot, I want to focus on something off to the side,
    like, let’s say, a gator eye (I live in FL) but I want his entire body
    in the pic but mostly want his eye in perfect focus. So, I simply press
    my up/down/left/right control to move my focus point. I do not have to
    go into a menu or hit extra buttons in order to hit my focus “control
    arrows”. They are just there all the time.
    Now, with the Sony, I had
    to go to menu to reconfigure a button/wheel (I chose right wheel) This
    was fine, no problem. But then I had to hit the center/Ok button, then
    tap the right side of the wheel, then turn the wheel to move the focus
    point to the (for example) gator eye. And that was for each and every
    shot. All of that poking and moving while using the view finder caused
    several missed shots at a local event that was not static like my gator
    example.
    Is this something that is typical of Sony mirrorless, or is
    it me not understanding something? Other than that, I was amazed at how
    great the shots were.
    Your input would be greatly appreciated.

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