The uncertain path

By |2014-11-21T09:57:19+00:00Nov 21st, 2014|

Split toning is one of my favorite stylization actions to apply to my photos. Actually, judging by the success of companies like VSCO, it is safe to say that lots of photographers are digging hard on split toning. And why shouldn’t we? This simple technique allows me to add another layer of complexity to my images beyond what I would be able to capture just with my camera. I took this image a few weeks ago after Nicole and I finished up a shoot at Big Spring Creek Falls. I believe we were on FR90 when we came across this expanse of hilly pavement. The fog was moving fast so we jumped out of the jeep and got our shots in. Fortunately, there weren’t any other cars on the road to deal with, so we had no problem monopolizing it. I chose a vertical comp because I feel that it compliments the trees more and allows me to include more of the pavement at the bottom of the frame.

The setup was pretty straight forward: my Sony a7R with the Sony 70-400mm f/4-5.6 lens sitting atop my Really Right Stuff TVC-34L/BH-55 tripod. I had a 3-stop ND filter, made by Formatt Hitech, to help drag the shutter a bit. This was mostly to capture a bit of the fog’s movement. I stylized in Lightroom using, you guessed it, a split toned effect.

2 Comments

  1. The uncertain path - Pixel Stock Photos November 21, 2014 at 10:12 am - Reply

    […] Brian Matiash Split toning is one of my favorite stylization actions to apply to my photos. Actually, judging by […]

  2. lensflaredave November 22, 2014 at 6:14 am - Reply

    Great image here Brian, I love that the road is empty also. Split toning certainly can be a very useful tool in Lightroom, I sometimes use it to create a more cross-processed look but also to use it to add a digital warm-up filter to my landscape shots as well. Great post as always.

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