Brian’s Photo Tip: Using Natural Leading Lines

By | 2014-08-13T19:05:39+00:00 Aug 12th, 2014|

I love it when a plan comes together! At the time, the clouds in this frame would be the only ones visible for two days straight. I was certain that they’d disappear just in time for sunset and they surely did. However, having them present for this photo really was a blessing because the light was so terribly hard. That being said, getting this photo the way I had envisioned was not without its challenges. In order to minimize how much of the sunny area I would include, I had to position my camera at this particular angle

It worked out in a way because it positioned Mt. Rainier on the top third of the frame, towards the right. The key now would be to find some sort of leading line to draw the viewers eye up to it. That’s when these blooming wildflowers came to the rescue! I just needed to find a patch that let me keep this camera angle and the rest was history.

I took the photo with my Sony A7r and Sony 16-35/2.8 A-mount lens. Because my Really Right Stuff TVC-34L/BH-55 tripod doesn’t have a center column, I was able to splay the legs out really wide and get low to the ground without obstruction. I used a 6-stop Formatt-Hitech ND filter and a 3-stop Soft-Grad filter to help cut the light down, as well. The warm-vintage tone was achieved in Analog Efex Pro 2, part of the Nik Collection by Google.

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